Leaving a legacy (with a little help) . . .

Let’s start with this. I am not what you would call a journal kind of guy. I like to keep my internal thoughts . . . well, internal.

So, when Ned over at Rebel And Create (go check the site and the podcast, it’s a fantastic resource for dads wanting to be better dads) sent me this journal he’s created, I wasn’t sure if I would be able to keep it up.

This is not your ordinary journal.

Ned gives you all the tools you need in this one beautifully bound book to decide who you want to be as a dad, celebrate your victories, reflect on and learn from your mistakes, give yourself grace when (not if) you screw up, and really focus on how to be a better version of you.

The journal covers 3 months. Each month starts out with a calendar so you can plot out your month with what you have to do and what you want to do. Already, this makes it more practical than any other journal I’ve tried. Then the daily entries are a series of guided prompts to help you focus your mind and your heart on what really matters: your family and how you can best love and serve them.

I worry about leaving a legacy for my kids. I don’t always feel like I have that much to offer. I’m a former retail manager turned stay at home dad. Whoopie. But I’m starting to understand that it’s not what I do for a living that matters. It’s how I live. My 2 year old doesn’t care what my paycheck looks like. She just wants to know that Dada will hold her (and get her cheese on demand). She just needs to know that Daddy is there and will love her no mater what.

One of my favorite things that surprised me is a small not printed on the first few pages: “If found after my death, please give to my children.” This is not just a tool to better your own life. This is a legacy you give to your kids, so they can see just how much you tried to invest of yourself in their childhood.

Ned, thanks a ton for this, thanks for having a passion to help fellow dads out on this adventure of fatherhood, and thanks for this piece of the map to get to the end of it better than we started.